With the pace of social media and the frequency of blogging, not to mention that many of your content assets will be used across multiple campaigns and teams, a lightweight project management tool is critical. I recommend using a free software called Trello, which helps you organize your content, set deadlines, attach files, and collaborate with multiple teammates. Another great tool for keeping content projects organized from planning to publishing is Zerys -- a content marketing tool with a built-in marketplace of professional writers. 
There are a couple of routes you can take with copywriting. One you can work for an ad agency as an employee, or you can start your own freelance copywriting business. Most ad agencies will require you to have a marketing or advertising degree, which is one reason why many copywriters choose to freelance. Plus, you can make more money as a freelancer.
Use an existing degree to get into content writing. An English degree, or other writing and reading focused degree, can be used to get into content writing, especially if you feel you have strong writing skills. Consider how well you did in your English classes, writing essays, book reports, and other assignments. Would you be willing to spend hours a day writing on a variety of topics for an employer? Could your existing writing skills translate into more professional writing for an employer?[8]

As you can see from these sample answers, there’s a big difference between features and benefits. Features are the technical aspects of the product, and the benefits are the way those features help customers accomplish something they want to accomplish. It’s good to record both, but we’ll talk more about the importance of benefits in a later chapter.


To be honest, any extra qualification (this included) is going to give you a better chance of getting a copywriting job – as you can pop it on your resume and it’ll give you a competitive advantage over those who don’t have it. There are no hard and fast rules when it comes to job-hunting. But it will also give you some extra experience writing different types of copy, and generally make you a better writer. That’s also going to improve your chances of getting a job, as you’ll (hopefully) be able to blow them away with your job application.

Businesses focused on expanding their reach to more customers will want to pay attention to the increase in the volume of visitors, as well as the quality of those interactions. Traditional measures of volume include the number of visitors to a page and number of emails collected, while time spent on page and click-through to other pages/ photos are good indicators for engagement.
thank you for this. i used to be an in-house copywriter back when i was in the philippines and looking back, i have to accept that it was my best work ever (because it didn’t feel like work and was more like a way of life). i decided not to pursue it when i came to canada because i had other things in mind – mainly to build a family. though i am still happily married to the same husband who brought me here almost 15 years ago, we never had kids and i am just living a ho-hum life of a dispensable clerk in an insurance company. i survived two take-overs and am living on a not-so-bad clerk’s salary and the promise of a little pension when i get too old and creaky, but i have to admit that i still miss copywriting (especially when i get reminded of how my job is just sucking the life out of me.) there’s this big chunk of my heart that is raring to copywrite again but with a rusted out experience, i honestly don’t know how and where to start anew.
Unlike other forms of online marketing, content marketing relies on anticipating and meeting an existing customer need for information, as opposed to creating demand for a new need. As James O'Brien of Contently wrote on Mashable, "The idea central to content marketing is that a brand must give something valuable to get something valuable in return. Instead of the commercial, be the show. Instead of the banner ad, be the feature story."[3] Content marketing requires continuous delivery of large amounts of content, preferably within a content marketing strategy.[4]
Let's say you're using PPC as your primary means of generating leads for your business. You need more leads, and decide to bid on the term "infographic generator" for $2 a click. At the end of your month-long campaign, you generated 1,000 leads and spent $10,000. Not bad. But what about next month? You have to spend $10,000 again. And again. And again. That is, if you want the leads to keep coming. In other words, when you turn the faucet of money off, leads stop coming out. The same concept applies with list purchasing, tradeshow marketing -- anything where you don't own the property from which leads are generated. Now let's contrast that experience against, say, blogging.
Blog posts. Distill your content marketing strategy into your blog schedule or strategy. The company blog can and should be used to cross-promote other content, which will help keep posts on a consistent schedule. If you don’t have a marketing team member who is familiar with search engine optimization (SEO), this is one area where you might want to consult a professional. 
Add value. That’s the secret. It’s not really a secret at all. We've already talked about it throughout this piece. Although when you look at some of the marketing companies engage in you wonder if they’re purposely avoiding the obvious. We skip advertising when it provides little to no value. If you want to learn about advertising that doesn’t get skipped, find a skateboarder and ask him if you can watch him look through a skateboard magazine. You’ll see that he spends as much time looking at the ads as he does looking at the articles and photos. Or check out The Berrics website. Much of the content is advertisements, but skaters don’t skip these videos, they watch them just like they watch the other videos, because they’re getting the value they want--good skating. As a skater I’d like to say skateboard companies pioneered content marketing decades ago, but I know they were only doing what came naturally, and selling more product was secondary to the fun of creating videos and magazines. If you want to hire someone onto your marketing team who understands content marketing intuitively, hiring a skateboarder might not be a bad step.

Design, content marketing, SEO, and growth hacking are all parts of a complete digital marketing plan, but copywriting is the glue that ties it all together. Copy gives your design meaning and lays the foundation for your content marketing, SEO, and growth hacking. Writing better copy enables you to convert more readers into customers, and we wanted to provide a guide that would give you an advantage when writing copy both on and offline.

Consider a technical writing certificate. Technical writing is a type of content writing that focuses on communicating technical material through manuals, reports, and online documents. This could be a how to guide, a safety manual for a worksite, or a document on a process or procedure. There is a growing demand for technical writers who can explain complex procedures to the average reader.
This platform provides you with a list of classes on the various aspects of professional writing skills. Divided into three difficulty levels – beginner, intermediate and advanced, there are courses for varying kinds of requirements. Explore the different aspects of this skill, working on social media platforms such as Instagram, LinkedIn along with the accompanying examples in the programs. Upon the completion of your chosen training, you will have projects to showcase your newly acquired skills and the knowledge to implement them at your workplaces. Additionally, the lectures help you to understand how to turn your skills into successful sales. 
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