What exactly is copywriting? Copywriting is the art and science of writing copy (words used on web pages, ads, promotional materials, etc.) that sells your product or service and convinces prospective customers to take action. In many ways, it’s like hiring one salesman to reach all of your customers. A sales team contacts customers one at a time; a copywriter reaches all of them at once through billboards, magazine ads, sales letters, blog posts, and more.

As you can see from these sample answers, there’s a big difference between features and benefits. Features are the technical aspects of the product, and the benefits are the way those features help customers accomplish something they want to accomplish. It’s good to record both, but we’ll talk more about the importance of benefits in a later chapter.

In theory, this should be a great ad because it mentions upfront—in the very first few characters of the headline—how cheap these custom-printed shirts can be. However, this can also raise more questions than it answers. For example, these shirts might be very affordable, but how good can they be for less than $2 per shirt? As a hypothetical prospect, I’m already questioning the quality of the product before I’ve even clicked through, which isn’t the desired effect.
For example, a car insurance company could use a headline like this: “Are You Paying Too Much for Your Car Insurance?” The ad would then go on to talk about how most customers pay more than they need for car insurance, and how company X can save them more money (which is something similar to what GEICO currently does). The purpose of the ad is first to focus on the pain, and then to talk about how Company X alleviates that pain.
With a marketing team size of around 18, your content marketing team will be staffed with all the same roles -- bloggers, long-form content creators, SEO specialists, designers -- just multiplied. Aim to have three bloggers on staff, and two employees for each of the other roles. It's wise to have one of those bloggers have expertise in editing, too, so there's someone dedicated to maintaining content quality as output increases.
thank you for this. i used to be an in-house copywriter back when i was in the philippines and looking back, i have to accept that it was my best work ever (because it didn’t feel like work and was more like a way of life). i decided not to pursue it when i came to canada because i had other things in mind – mainly to build a family. though i am still happily married to the same husband who brought me here almost 15 years ago, we never had kids and i am just living a ho-hum life of a dispensable clerk in an insurance company. i survived two take-overs and am living on a not-so-bad clerk’s salary and the promise of a little pension when i get too old and creaky, but i have to admit that i still miss copywriting (especially when i get reminded of how my job is just sucking the life out of me.) there’s this big chunk of my heart that is raring to copywrite again but with a rusted out experience, i honestly don’t know how and where to start anew.
Most copywriters thoroughly research the products and services about which they are asked to write so that they can produce accurate, appealing advertisements. They also consider the target audience and formulate their language and style in a way that will be interesting and attention-grabbing. A client may want a one-line phrase, a catchy jingle, or a multiple-paragraph summary of a product or service. After getting a general idea of the client's wishes, the advertising copywriter comes up with the specifics about the campaign.
He is the co-founder of NP Digital and Subscribers. The Wall Street Journal calls him a top influencer on the web, Forbes says he is one of the top 10 marketers, and Entrepreneur Magazine says he created one of the 100 most brilliant companies. Neil is a New York Times bestselling author and was recognized as a top 100 entrepreneur under the age of 30 by President Obama and a top 100 entrepreneur under the age of 35 by the United Nations.
Read Joe Pulizzi's excellent book Epic Content Marketing. I started reading it after I wrote this post and it confirmed and expanded what I already knew about content marketing, with much more detail than I could ever go into here. Something Pulizzi emphasizes which I originally left out was the importance of focusing on producing mobile-friendly content, since smartphones are becoming the dominant way in which most of our customers access content. Also read Michael Hyatt's Platform, mentioned above. Frequent websites like those of Content Marketing Institute, Ragan, Copyblogger, Michael Hyatt, and Gary Vaynerchuk and sign up for their email newsletters. It won't take you long to become not just familiar with content marketing, but an expert.
The reliable source of traffic and leads from your evergreen content will give you the flexibility to experiment with other marketing tactics to generate revenue, such as sponsored content, social media advertising, and distributed content. Plus, your content will not only help attract leads -- it will also help educate your target prospects and generate awareness for your brand.

thank you for this. i used to be an in-house copywriter back when i was in the philippines and looking back, i have to accept that it was my best work ever (because it didn’t feel like work and was more like a way of life). i decided not to pursue it when i came to canada because i had other things in mind – mainly to build a family. though i am still happily married to the same husband who brought me here almost 15 years ago, we never had kids and i am just living a ho-hum life of a dispensable clerk in an insurance company. i survived two take-overs and am living on a not-so-bad clerk’s salary and the promise of a little pension when i get too old and creaky, but i have to admit that i still miss copywriting (especially when i get reminded of how my job is just sucking the life out of me.) there’s this big chunk of my heart that is raring to copywrite again but with a rusted out experience, i honestly don’t know how and where to start anew.
You've written a blog post that has wide appeal beyond just your target audience. You test promotion of that blog post via a paid Facebook ad, and find that the CPC is lower than your typical paid expenditures, and is driving 40% more site traffic than those typical expenditures. Even so, when you turn off that budget you lose that traffic ... right? Right. But you still received a huge influx of traffic that, even if none of them convert to leads, might have spurred either inbound links or social shares -- both of which will help bolster your SEO.
Content marketing is a quickly growing field. With that growth comes opportunities for entrepreneurial-minded writers. If you're curious about getting started in content marketing, we've put together a guide that should tell you if you are cut out for the job -- and if you need content writers for your next project. Find out as we discuss content marketing 101.
At this stage of growth, it's also time to assign dedicated leadership to your content marketing team -- unless you want two dozen people reporting to the CMO. Many organizations hire a Director of Content, VP of Content, Chief Content Officer, or Editor-in-Chief to lead the entire content marketing team. This individual sets the vision for the team, secures budget, hires the right talent, contributes content ideas, solves for growth, and helps coordinate with other leaders across the marketing organization so content marketing doesn't become too siloed.
Most people start out with blog posts, but if you want to venture out and try producing other content pieces, consider which ones you want to make. For instance, if you've been doing weekly blog posts for the past year, creating an ebook that distills all your blog posts into one ultimate guide would be a one way to offer information in a different format. We'll go over several different types of content you can use further down on the list.
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