The personal finance site Mint.com used content marketing, specifically their personal finance blog MintLife, to build an audience for a product they planned to sell. According to entrepreneur Sachin Rekhi, Mint.com concentrated on building the audience for MintLife "independent of the eventual Mint.com product."[18] Content on the blog included how-to guides on paying for college, saving for a house, and getting out of debt. Other popular content included in-depth interviews and a series of financial disasters called "Trainwreck Tuesdays." The popularity of the site surged as did demand for the product. "Mint grew quickly enough to sell to Intuit for $170 million after three years in business. By 2013, the tool reached 10 million users, many of whom trusted Mint to handle their sensitive banking information because of the blog’s smart, helpful content."[19]
I want to get into copywriting big time. I work with an Advertising Agency and have rather working knowledge of copywriting. If you have an assignment at hands can you share it with me. I’ll spend some time doing it and will share my copy with you. That way you can give me your inputs on how am I doing, what needs work and so on. You can give me a live assignment may be some of my thoughts will add to your existing thoughts!
Very Small (1-9 employees) Jobs Content Marketing Jobs SEO Backlinking Jobs Startup Jobs Text Ads Jobs HubSpot Jobs Virtual Assistant Jobs Campaign Optimization Jobs Content Writing Jobs Shopify Jobs Fashion Jobs Administrative Support Jobs Writing Jobs WordPress Jobs Instagram Jobs Web Design Jobs Yahoo Jobs CSS Jobs Facebook Jobs Social Media Marketing Jobs Google Analytics Jobs SEO Writing Jobs Email Marketing Jobs Blog Writing Jobs SEO Keyword Research Jobs Google Ads Jobs Conversion Rate Optimization Jobs Tracking & Analytics Jobs On-Page Optimization Jobs Facebook Advertising Jobs Mid (100-999 employees) Jobs Product Listing Ads Jobs eCommerce Jobs Mobile Jobs SEO Audit Jobs Paid Media Jobs Creative Writing Jobs Social Media Management Jobs Campaign Management Jobs PHP Jobs Adobe Advertising Cloud Jobs Adobe Photoshop Jobs Video Ads Jobs Small (10-99 employees) Jobs Display Ads Jobs Keap Jobs Retargeting Jobs Google AdSense Jobs Copywriting Jobs Pinterest Ads Manager Jobs Article Writing Jobs LinkedIn Campaign Manager Jobs Social Media Advertising Jobs DoubleClick for Publishers Jobs Pay Per Click Jobs Marketo Jobs SEO Jobs Off-page Optimization Jobs Project Management Jobs English Grammar Jobs Ahrefs Jobs Education Jobs Content Marketing Strategy Jobs Market Research Jobs Adobe Illustrator Jobs ActiveCampaign Jobs Bing Jobs Amazon Jobs Instagram Marketing Jobs Digital Marketing Jobs Large (1000+ employees) Jobs B2C Jobs Customer Service Jobs Ad Servers Jobs Google Search Console Jobs Budgeting & Forecasting Jobs Internet Research Jobs eBay Jobs Link Building Jobs Internet Marketing Jobs Search Engine Marketing Jobs SEO Auditing Jobs Snapchat Ads Manager Jobs Consumer Goods Jobs Website Development Jobs MailChimp Jobs B2B Jobs Facebook Marketing Jobs Influencer Marketing Jobs Desktop Jobs Google Jobs Iterable Jobs Facebook Ads Manager Jobs Squarespace Jobs Lead Generation Jobs Fortune 500 Jobs Twitter Ads Manager Jobs Audit Jobs
When businesses pursue content marketing, the main focus should be the needs of the prospect or customer. Once a business has identified the customer's need, information can be presented in a variety of formats, including news, video, white papers, e-books, infographics, email newsletters, case studies, podcasts, how-to guides, question and answer articles, photos, blogs, etc.[5] Most of these formats belong to the digital channel.
There are a couple of routes you can take with copywriting. One you can work for an ad agency as an employee, or you can start your own freelance copywriting business. Most ad agencies will require you to have a marketing or advertising degree, which is one reason why many copywriters choose to freelance. Plus, you can make more money as a freelancer.
Check your local college or university for a technical writing certificate program. Look at the faculty of the program to confirm you are being taught by professionals in the field or working content writers who are familiar with the demands of the writing industry. Certificate programs can be beneficial for writers who are new to content writing or technical writing.[6]

An individual who wants to become an advertising copywriter has several options for breaking into the field. Some people choose to pursue bachelor's degrees or higher in marketing, writing, journalism, or communications. A degree can prepare a prospective copywriter for the various business and writing duties of the job, and college experience is a requirement of many employers. Other professionals begin their careers as general freelance writers, perhaps writing informational articles, technical papers, or grants to gain experience. By building a writing portfolio and obtaining strong references, a hopeful copywriter may get the opportunity to submit a resume and samples to potential employers.


An advertising copywriter is a professional writer who creates marketing campaigns and advertisements. A copywriter might create content for websites, physical publications, billboards, or commercial scripts. Clients depend on copywriters to come up with clever, funny, or informative ads that customers will find interesting. Some large corporations staff full- or part-time writers to work on multiple marketing campaigns, though many advertising copywriters are self-employed contractors, offering freelance services to different clients.

The second way you can become a copywriter is by taking a home-study course that teaches you the trade of copywriting. Many copywriting programs can be completed within a few months and cost less $500.00. In fact, I have a couple of friends who got started this way. One got started by reading Peter Bowerman's book, The Well-Fed Writer: Financial Self-Sufficiency as a Commercial Freelancer in Six Months or Less and the other took a program through American Writers & Artists Inc. (AWAI).
Your marketing plan should go beyond the types of content you'll create -- it should also cover you'll organize your content. With the help of an editorial calendar, you'll be on the right track for publishing a well-balanced and diverse content library on your website. Then, create a social media content calendar so you can promote and manage your content on other sites.

Infographics. These are generally long, vertical graphics that include statistics, charts, graphs, and other information. If you need some examples, here are 197 infographics on the topic of content marketing curated by Michael Schmitz, head of Content Lab at Publicis, Munich. Infographics can be effective in that if one is good it can be passed around social media and posted on websites for years. You can get a professionally designed infographic by hiring a contractor on a site like oDesk or if you want to remove some of the risk you can go with a company like Visua.ly. A decent infographic will usually cost you at least $1,000 to have designed, but can cost several thousand dollars if you are hiring a contractor or agency to include strategy and planning, research, copywriting, and design. There is also the matter of promoting that infographic to bloggers and the media. Or you could set up a board on Pinterest and curate infographics on a topic related to your business. That is also a form of content marketing, and it costs nothing but your time. Hey, it worked for Michael.

There are as many types of content marketing as there are types of content--far too many to cover here. My intent is to give you an introduction to content marketing and get you thinking like a content marketer so you’ll see the opportunities all around you. Soon you’ll be coming up with 50 content marketing ideas every day. You won’t be able to stop seeing opportunities to create content. Here are five examples to help your mind start percolating.
At my own company we’ve used content marketing to grow more than 1,000% over the past year. Potential clients find our content, find value in it, and by the time they contact us they’re already convinced they want to work with us. We don’t have to engage in any high pressure sales tactics, it’s merely a matter of working out details, signing an agreement, and getting started. The trust that usually needs to be built up during an extensive sales cycle has already been created before we know the potential client exists.

Starting a podcast will help audiences find your brand if they don't have time or interest in reading content every day. The number of podcast listeners is growing -- in 2018, nearly one-third of the U.S. population has listened to a podcast in the last month. If you have interesting people to interview or conversations to host, consider podcasting as another content format to experiment with.


The reliable source of traffic and leads from your evergreen content will give you the flexibility to experiment with other marketing tactics to generate revenue, such as sponsored content, social media advertising, and distributed content. Plus, your content will not only help attract leads -- it will also help educate your target prospects and generate awareness for your brand.
×